Other Tildes to check out!

tilde.team – one tiny standard unix computer in
the cloud that anyone can use and learn to use in the shared pursuit of cool sites and unix tools

tildespark  – Tilde Spark is a constantly evolving intentional community devoted to free software, open hardware and meeting new people!

tilde.fun – This is a Linux machine on the internet where you can get a shell account.

ctrl-c.club – A place for the curious to poke around and
play. SSH access, web pages, games, and programming languages on tap.

pebble.ink – pebble.ink is a project almost, but not quite, like tilde.club

hackers.cool – A tilde.club started by some nerd at Hacker School. As such,
it’s got a lot of Hacker Schoolers on it, but everyone is welcome!

squiggle.city – squiggle.city is a Debian server in the spirit of tilde.club.
It’s for making web pages and learning about the command line. If you are reading userland, which is about how to unix,
squiggle.city is a place to explore the ideas it contains.

tilde.town – tilde.town is an open, welcoming and safe place for the
exploration of lo-fi HTML art, hi-fi javascript experiments, generative poetic works, and digital socialization in a post-facebook age.

palvelin.club – Finnish language tilde server.

skylab.org – An open-source community co-operative with ~150 members that has existed since 1997. Based in Portland, Oregon, United States with a userbase across the world, we have quietly existed.
Featuring geektalk community chat, a variety of tools and hosting running on FreeBSD.

protocol.club – protocol.club explores the fundamental and unique learning opportunities provided by the implementation of standardized protocols. It is a place for curious minds to explore and experiment, to educate and be educated about protocols and implementations old and new alike. While inspired by tilde.club and federated with the rest of the tildeverse via NNTP (et cetera), protocol.club has a stronger focus on its particular mission and has several differences from other tilde boxes, namely: we have a Code of Conduct, and we have some resources available locally to aid development of protocol implementations and new draft protocols. We also serve pages over HTTPS.